Medicine News

Block & lock: A pathway to HIV remission

13 November 2019
Target Sites: 
The Kirby Institute (Please do not publish without approval prior)
Contact Name: 
Dr Chantelle Ahlenstiel
image - HIV Header

Researchers at the Kirby Institute are investigating new ways to permanently control – or ‘block and lock’ – HIV-1 infection, and are looking for the next generation of researchers to join this exciting project.

Research Highlights the Prevalence of and Common Risk Factors for Post-Stroke Cognitive Impairment

12 November 2019
Target Sites: 
Medicine (select for all events)
CHeBA2 (Please do not publish without approval prior)
School of Psychiatry
Jessica Lo and Professor Perminder Sachdev AM

HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au

Latest research led by the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at UNSW Sydney has identified global prevalence and common risk factors for cognitive impairment following a stroke.

When there was no hope, there was David Cooper. Please give generously to continue his legacy.

7 November 2019
Target Sites: 
The Kirby Institute (Please do not publish without approval prior)

David ‘Polly’ Polson knows first-hand the life-changing impact that Professor David Cooper had on his patients.

When Polly was diagnosed with HIV in 1984, he saw friends and colleagues with the same diagnosis passing away around him. He had no idea what was going to happen to him.

A friend referred him to researcher and clinician Professor David Cooper, and he quickly encouraged Polly to join a number of drug trials.

From clinic to Haus Dur: Rethinking HIV testing in PNG

6 November 2019
Target Sites: 
The Kirby Institute (Please do not publish without approval prior)
image - 191107 From Clinic To Haus Dur

Kirby Institute researchers have authored a report evaluating whether new HIV at-home or community-based testing models would be an acceptable and feasible approach to boost HIV testing in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

Mechanical Tuning of the Senses

6 November 2019
Target Sites: 
Medicine (select for all events)
Single Molecule Science
SoMS
Changing the mechanical properties of elastic micropillars that cells are grown on can tune mechanical signalling (setup and microscopy image shown)

Physical changes in the surrounding microenvironment of cells, in the absence of any other modifications, are enough to affect the way they sense touch, a UNSW Medicine research shows.

“Individual cells are exposed to so many different types of mechanical input—vibration, stretch, soft and hard stimuli. I think it’s really interesting to investigate how cells can distinguish between them,” says study lead author, Dr Kate Poole.

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